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Parenting Tip
September 11, 2014
The Value of Correction

Correcting children can be exasperating. Part of the problem is that children don't usually value correction. Instead they become defensive, offer excuses, blame others, or even blame themselves. These manipulative techniques cause children to miss the benefits of correction.

Of course, it's not just a kid problem. How do you respond when your spouse or co-worker offers some helpful criticism? What about from your children? Are you able to take advice from your child at times?

If you're going to help children learn to respond well to correction, you must start by giving them a vision for its benefits. Talk to your kids about things you've learned when others have corrected you. Invite your children to correct you in a particular area of your life you're working on. (Of course, they need to learn how to give advice or point out a problem in a gracious way!)

Explain how the poor responses people have deflect the correction and cause a person to not learn and grow. Explore with children the reasons why people don't like to be corrected. These discussions can open the door for children to rethink their own responses.

Proverbs is full of verses that talk about the value of correction. You might want to do a study of them with your children. One is Proverbs 12:1, "Whoever loves discipline loves knowledge, but he who hates correction is stupid." That sounds like the beginning of a great conversation with your child, doesn't it?

Heeding correction helps a person become wise. It's better to avoid a trap through correction than to fall into it and have to learn from experience. In fact, many of the valuable lessons of life are learned through correction in one form or another. Although children may not appreciate it, the correction they receive from you is a gift and your persistence can provide them with the wisdom they need both now and for the future.

For more on how to build a good Correction Routine with your children, read the book Good and Angry, Exchanging Frustration for Character In You and Your Kids by Dr Scott Turansky and Joanne Miller, RN, BSN.

More Helpful Tips:
A Lesson in Honor
A Practical Way to Teach Responsibility
A Practical Way to Teach Values
A Time to Practice Saying Thank You
A Work in Progress
Addressing Sibling Conflict
Allow Life to Be the Teacher

An Indirect Approach to Sibling Conflict
Anger is Good
Be Firm Without Being Harsh
Building Relationship Makes Kids More Responsive
Caring for Others
Christmas: A Time to Teach Generosity
Communication is Key
Dealing with Morning Dawdling
Desire and Temptation
Don't be Deterred by Resistance
Don't Take the Bait
Emotional Cues
Ending Every Discipline Time Positively
Ending the Discipline Time Positively
Explain New Rules Before You Start
Getting Kids to Listen without Yelling
Giving Instructions
Helping Kids Deal with Emotions
Helping Children Take Responsibility - Part 2
Helping Children Take Responsibility – Part 1
Honesty Requires Character
Honor Defined in Practical Terms

Inspecting Children's Work
Is there a Difference Between Honor and Respect?
Kids Love Heroes
Keep Connections Open
Look Out For Boasting
Missed Opportunities
Monitor Frustration Levels
Not Just Behavior Change
Obey First and Then We'll Talk About It
Parenting Babies
Patterns in Family Life
Practical Ways to Connect with Your Child’s Heart
Problem Solving and Decision Making
Retraining the Heart
Sad Instead of Mad
Should I Change My Mind?
Some Kids Drain Energy Out of Family Life

Stop Anger When it Starts
Strong-Willed Children are a Blessing
Tasks, Problems, Conflict

Teach Children What to Do Next Time
Teaching Children About Anger
Teaching Children to Look for Ways to Help
Teaching Children to Wait
Teaching Through Decision Making
Teaching "Why" Helps Children For the Future
Teens Need Relationship
“That’s Not Fair!”

The Benefit of Reporting Back
The Conscience Needs Training
The Good Side of Anger
The Gratefulness Principle
The Key to Making Devotions Fun
The Truth about Lying
The Value of Correction
The Way You Give Instructions
Use Generosity to Teach Honor
When Children Resist Instructions
When Giving Instructions, Consider the Timing
When Kids Want to Fight

Where a Bad Attitude Comes From
Your Child has a Conscience


 

Parenting Tip
September 11, 2014
The Value of Correction

Correcting children can be exasperating. Part of the problem is that children don't usually value correction. Instead they become defensive, offer excuses, blame others, or even blame themselves. These manipulative techniques cause children to miss the benefits of correction.

Of course, it's not just a kid problem. How do you respond when your spouse or co-worker offers some helpful criticism? What about from your children? Are you able to take advice from your child at times?

If you're going to help children learn to respond well to correction, you must start by giving them a vision for its benefits. Talk to your kids about things you've learned when others have corrected you. Invite your children to correct you in a particular area of your life you're working on. (Of course, they need to learn how to give advice or point out a problem in a gracious way!)

Explain how the poor responses people have deflect the correction and cause a person to not learn and grow. Explore with children the reasons why people don't like to be corrected. These discussions can open the door for children to rethink their own responses.

Proverbs is full of verses that talk about the value of correction. You might want to do a study of them with your children. One is Proverbs 12:1, "Whoever loves discipline loves knowledge, but he who hates correction is stupid." That sounds like the beginning of a great conversation with your child, doesn't it?

Heeding correction helps a person become wise. It's better to avoid a trap through correction than to fall into it and have to learn from experience. In fact, many of the valuable lessons of life are learned through correction in one form or another. Although children may not appreciate it, the correction they receive from you is a gift and your persistence can provide them with the wisdom they need both now and for the future.

For more on how to build a good Correction Routine with your children, read the book Good and Angry, Exchanging Frustration for Character In You and Your Kids by Dr Scott Turansky and Joanne Miller, RN, BSN.

More Helpful Tips:
A Lesson in Honor
A Practical Way to Teach Responsibility
A Practical Way to Teach Values
A Time to Practice Saying Thank You
A Work in Progress
Addressing Sibling Conflict
Allow Life to Be the Teacher

An Indirect Approach to Sibling Conflict
Anger is Good
Be Firm Without Being Harsh
Building Relationship Makes Kids More Responsive
Caring for Others
Christmas: A Time to Teach Generosity
Communication is Key
Dealing with Morning Dawdling
Desire and Temptation
Don't be Deterred by Resistance
Don't Take the Bait
Emotional Cues
Ending Every Discipline Time Positively
Ending the Discipline Time Positively
Explain New Rules Before You Start
Getting Kids to Listen without Yelling
Giving Instructions
Helping Kids Deal with Emotions
Helping Children Take Responsibility - Part 2
Helping Children Take Responsibility – Part 1
Honesty Requires Character
Honor Defined in Practical Terms

Inspecting Children's Work
Is there a Difference Between Honor and Respect?
Kids Love Heroes
Keep Connections Open
Look Out For Boasting
Missed Opportunities
Monitor Frustration Levels
Not Just Behavior Change
Obey First and Then We'll Talk About It
Parenting Babies
Patterns in Family Life
Practical Ways to Connect with Your Child’s Heart
Problem Solving and Decision Making
Retraining the Heart
Sad Instead of Mad
Should I Change My Mind?
Some Kids Drain Energy Out of Family Life

Stop Anger When it Starts
Strong-Willed Children are a Blessing
Tasks, Problems, Conflict

Teach Children What to Do Next Time
Teaching Children About Anger
Teaching Children to Look for Ways to Help
Teaching Children to Wait
Teaching Through Decision Making
Teaching "Why" Helps Children For the Future
Teens Need Relationship
“That’s Not Fair!”

The Benefit of Reporting Back
The Conscience Needs Training
The Good Side of Anger
The Gratefulness Principle
The Key to Making Devotions Fun
The Truth about Lying
The Value of Correction
The Way You Give Instructions
Use Generosity to Teach Honor
When Children Resist Instructions
When Giving Instructions, Consider the Timing
When Kids Want to Fight

Where a Bad Attitude Comes From
Your Child has a Conscience